skeleton

Happy New Year!

Long over due, but here is an updated practice question of the month!

Good luck studying!

 

A collegiate football athlete during pre-season camp experienced signs and symptoms associated with exertional heat stroke. You decide to perform complete water immersion immediately and remove the athlete’s equipment. Throughout the complete water immersion, you are monitoring the athlete’s rectal temperature and other vital signs. How often should this occur?

A. Every 1-3 minutes

B. Every 5-10 minutes

C. Every 15 minutes

D. Every 30 minutes

 

SCROLL DOWN FOR ANSWER…..

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A collegiate football athlete during pre-season camp experienced signs and symptoms associated with exertional heat stroke. You decide to perform complete water immersion immediately and remove the athlete’s equipment. Throughout the complete water immersion, you are monitoring the athlete’s rectal temperature and other vital signs. How often should this occur?

A. Every 1-3 minutes

B. Every 5-10 minutes

C. Every 15 minutes

D. Every 30 minutes

 

During total water immersion for an individual who is suffering from exertional heat stroke, rectal temperature and other vital signs should be monitored every 5-10 minutes unless a continuous monitoring advance is available. If a continuous monitoring advance is available, that device should be used over intermittent measurements.

 

Casa DJ, DeMartini JK, Bergeron MF et al. National Athletic Trainers’ Association position statement: Exertional heat illness. J Athl Train. 2015;50(9):986-1000.

 

Check out our other questions of the month here.

Check out the MUST READ ARTICLES FOR THE OCS/SCS.

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Check out our PT Ortho Questions book by clicking here.  

Check our our PT Sports Questions book by clicking here.

Check out our PT Ortho and Sports Vol II book by clicking here.

All books available in print on Amazon.

Follow the authors on Twitter:

 

 

 

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@MansfieldCody

@JohnSnyderDPT

Also, follow John on his website by clicking here.

Although we know Clinical Prediction Rules have their weaknesses, understanding them for the OCS and SCS exam is very important.  John does a great job summarizing the strengths and weaknesses of all CPRs.  Click here to learn more.

@cmansfieldDPT

@MattBrancleone

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