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PRACTICE QUESTION

A 19-year-old male ice hockey player presents to your outpatient facility with a chief complaint of left groin pain. He is a goaltender and notes having increased groin pain during and after competition.

During the subjective interview, he reports a reproducible ‘popping’ sensation during squatting activities in his training program. He denies having any significant previous injuries aside from a high-grade proximal rectus femoris tear when he was 16 years old. He denies having a specific incident that led to his symptoms and describes his pain as a deep ache and he cannot localize it to a specific isolated location. After competition he reports having increased groin pain with prolonged sitting, deep squatting, walking up stairs.

When attempting to make the diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement syndrome, what three categories need to be satisfied?

  1. Clinical signs
  2. Symptoms
  3. Blood Testing
  4. Radiology

 

Scroll down for correct answer choices.

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Answer Choices

  1. Clinical Signs

According to the Warwick Agreement published by Griffin and colleagues, the diagnosis of Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome (FAIS) should be utilized when appropriate clinical signs, symptoms, and radiology have been satisified.

Griffin DR, Dickenson EJ, O’Donnell J, et al. The Warwick Agreement on femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAI syndrome): an international consensus statement. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2016; 50(19): 1169-1176. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096743.

 

  1. Symptoms

 According to the Warwick Agreement published by Griffin and colleagues, the diagnosis of Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome (FAIS) should be utilized when appropriate clinical signs, symptoms, and radiology have been satisified.

Griffin DR, Dickenson EJ, O’Donnell J, et al. The Warwick Agreement on femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAI syndrome): an international consensus statement. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2016; 50(19): 1169-1176. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096743.

 

  1. Blood testing

Presently, blood testing is not a beneficial measure in determining the presence of FAIS.

According to the Warwick Agreement published by Griffin and colleagues, the diagnosis of Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome (FAIS) should be utilized when appropriate clinical signs, symptoms, and radiology have been satisified.

Griffin DR, Dickenson EJ, O’Donnell J, et al. The Warwick Agreement on femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAI syndrome): an international consensus statement. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2016; 50(19): 1169-1176. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096743.

 

  1. Radiology

According to the Warwick Agreement published by Griffin and colleagues, the diagnosis of Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome (FAIS) should be utilized when appropriate clinical signs, symptoms, and radiology have been satisified.

Griffin DR, Dickenson EJ, O’Donnell J, et al. The Warwick Agreement on femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAI syndrome): an international consensus statement. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2016; 50(19): 1169-1176. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096743.

 

This practice question was written by John Snyder, primary author of our latest book:

PT Ortho and Sports Questions Volume II

Vol_2

Check out his website here.

He has a great resource on clinical predictions rules, which are important to know for the OCS/SCS exam.

Check out our other books on Amazon:

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